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20121129
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supports [speaker not understood] and maintain various uses and we strongly believe that maintaining the existing rules regarding uses in historic buildings will directly fulfill this goal. with all that said, i respectfully request that the commission maintain the existing historical use controls as part of the western soma plan. thank you. >> thank you. >>> good afternoon, commissioners. john kevlin here with the law if ierv of rubin junius. i want to talk to you about two specific issues in the western soma today. first is the historic use controls that luke was just referring to. these are currently in effect throughout the eastern neighborhoods and actually currently in effect under the existing controls in west soma. and essentially what these do is for certain classes of historic buildings, it relaxes the use controls in them with the goal of allowing the buildings to stay under operation, giving them flexibility so they can maintain and preserve them adequately since they all are historic resources. so, currently in the west soma, excuse me, this is a little technical so bear
'm never going to complain to jerry brown, what he to happen in the state legislature, because i used the first year and a half to insulate myself from all of that, emotionally as well as programmatically to say i'm not going to let the state hurt our city or the federal government. we've got to innovate our way out of this economic dole drum and we are doing so with inviting people here. those of you who take this word challenge, and really can really seriously bring that to fore with your best ideas, this is what i'm doing with all these technology companies. i'm not satisfied with just hosting a new company in the city, i want to know what they're doing, who's working there, where they're coming from, what they plan for the five or 10 years and how we can help them grow. as they're growing their jobs i want to know technologically how we can help. that's why i love going to accelerators, to find out what are the next five years that we're incubating so when it comes like what happened last week with dr. yam naka working at gladstone institute at mission bay becomes one of the newes
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
to nonstudent housing use. so, that beg the question of under what circumstances would the planning department need to be aware of that type of conversion. and i think the staff did a great job of pointing out there are only three limited circumstances. one is with the exemption from inclusionary housing requirements is taken advantage of. the other is the f.a.r. bonus, but that's only available in two of the c3 voting districts. -- zoning districts. the other is the exemption from the dwelling unit mixed requirement. that is a limited number of zoning districts as well. and i do appreciate that supervisor kim's office is clarifying the intent of the legislation in that regard, but quite frankly that's not the way it's currently drafted. a few other things i want to be clear as to what the legislation currently requires. it requires every entity that owns, operates or controls student housing to file an annual report with very extensive and proprietary information about all of its student housing, including existing student housing and on-campus student housing regardless of whether any new st
summary probation which meant go home and sin no more. and if you do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question co
talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and ma
to help us address construction and make it successful, as it is today. cmis is one of the first major tools we put in place. the next one is the san francisco online invoicing, where we are now working with the contractor and consultant to have them submit their invoices online. we are also working on electronic bidding systems. another way we can reduce the paperwork and all the other issues tied with the procurements. i live in san francisco. i am a rate-payer. i really care about the way we spend our money. systems like this that will allow transparency, clarity, accountability, and efficiency -- i think systems like this need to be applied to all parts of the city. we really strive to lead and embraced technology so we can be ahead of the game. [applause] >> we are spending $15 million per week just on our water system. that does not happen without incredibly good management, personnel management and i.t. systems to make it work. harlan kelly is responsible for all of that. [applause] >> good afternoon. first, i would like to thank spur and mfac for this prestigious award. also, e
people don't have the time, b) because we almost purposely use language that nobody understands. so, unfortunately, i think these are key limitations to the real translation of research to practice in the field, and not just in behavioral health. dr. peterson, is that true for prevention as well? yes, i would say it is true for prevention as well. there are people who work in real-world settings who are interested in helping prevent problems from occurring-in this case, substance abuse or mental health issues-and they have a lot of constraints on their time. they have a lot of constraints on other resources-could be money, could be technology. and, in terms of bringing research to practice, things that are done in a laboratory or academic setting, if you will, sometimes are not readily translatable into real-world settings with those constraints happening and with a variety of audiences that are in a community setting. so, yeah, i think the same is true in the prevention field as well as in the treatment arena. and, tom, in terms of what we are studying, give us a brief overlook of
with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o assistance with our many business partners. this is a core part of mfac original purpose in san francisco. we are focused on building this capacity once again. as everyone here knows, the nature of how cities are doing business is changing. fundamentally. costly federal and state mandates continue to squeeze local budgets. increasing costs are forcing discussions about how we provide services. technology is requiring that we move more quickly than we have in a long time. building a network of partners to support our city government at this time will be more important than ever and will be critical as we were to emerge from the recession. we have a real opportunity here. we also have a real responsibility to help investment and success of our city. spur is committed to making this happen. we hope that all of you join us as we work to leverage a lot of these partnerships once again. spur is a nonprofit. member-supported
people, i'm sure there are plenty of those uses 234 western soma. i think most of the people we've heard from are people who have legal nonconforming uses * that currently are in areas that don't permit office because right now under the current zoning you can't really have office anywhere. or you have people who want to do new office, which obviously that is a very sensitive issue in western soma because very high demand for office space. but it's not the kind of space -- not the kind of use they want to have to be prevalent throughout the plan area. we have the wmuo district on townsend street. we are permitting one floor of office space in the rcd -- >> right, already existing office. >> right. >> on top of that looking at now you have these article 11 buildings which i imagine many of which have existing office in them because they were allowed to today, now in the future won't be able to. so, looking at how we treat -- even if we choose to call out that category in a separate manner, i just think we need to figure it out because, you know, and actually put [speaker not understood]
. as psychologists, we study abnormal behavior. anita shows distribution, most of us in here. you get anybody out here who is externalizing or anyone out here who is internalizing, as a psychologist, we try to bring them back in here so they're more healthy. that's what we study. when you're having problems in your life or any other area, if we can do something, talking to you versus talk therapy or medicine that might help you, what we're trying to do is get everybody back here so we're just kind of more balanced. with respect to the traumatic brain injuries and other types of things, that's much simpler for people to kind of understand that you had a concussive event or you had a t.b.i., traumatic brain injury, that's caused problems. we should be developing ways of helping to manage and treat those problems just like we do individuals who have the other types of problems. >> let me just add one thing there, which is it's a good question, but it highlights one of the challenges of introducing neuroscience today in the courtroom. at kent showed you some of his slides and mentioned during his tal
defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, how do we want to account for that if at all in the criminal justice system? to date, we haven't. in the future, we may wish to. >> i agree with that. i think that, first of all, the fact that everybody
-funded study, people in recovery, and, of course, they all have a history of chronic substance use problem, because that's how they ended up in the study. in addition to that, over 50 percent of them have a chronic physical condition, 72 percent of whom have more than one. so they have multiple physical care condition. over a third of them also have a mental health condition, and the co-occurrence of these, when you look at, for example, the odds of developing one or more chronic physical condition as a function of having a mental health diagnosis, is two to three times across samples. so, people come in treatment, whether it's substance use treatment or mental health treatment or primary care treatment, they're one person with a whole lot of problems. and all of the providers who are professionally in a situation where they're likely to encounter and be called upon to treat these individuals have to be at least more than peripherally aware of the fact that this is going on, and currently in the training this is not happening. and there's also a hierarchy of diseases, if i may, where a per
avenue, request for conditional use authorization is proposed for continuance to january 24th, 2013. items 4a, b and c for case numbers 2009.0 724 d, 2012.0 888 d, and 2009.0 724 v at 2833 through 2835 fillmore street, mandatory discretionary reviews and variance have been withdrawn. further on your -- under your regular calendar, commissioners, item 15, case no. 2012.1 183 t and z, the amendments to planning code to establish the fillmore street ncd, there is a request from the sponsor and supervisor to continue to december 13th, 2012. and that's all i have. >> okay. is there any public comment on the items proposed for continuance? seeing none, commissioners? commissioner antonini. >> i am present. [laughter] >> and i would like to move continuance of item 1, item 2, item 3, and item -- those specified in item 15 to december 13th. >> second. >> on that motion, commissioner antonini? >> aye. >> commissioner borden? >> aye. >> commissioner hillis? >> aye. >> commissioner moore? >> aye. >> commissioner sugaya? >> aye. >> commissioner wu? >> aye. >> and commission president fong? >> a
consulted with outside counsel in hopes of finding this parcel was in compliance with the trust use. that led to a dead end. >> you expect the value to be pretty low. >> very low. >> okay, thank you. >> commissioner moore. >> i'm glad the project is coming forward and i very much appreciate commissioner antonini's questions about the grass. i would agree with him that the drought resistant trees offer [speaker not understood] being in the drought or dry instead of those kind of trees which help us also with sun and wind and protection of the adjacent unit which is energy efficiency. the one thing i would like to put a question mark to is that light green area astroturf for dogs. where did that come from? it is astroturf, artificial grass for dogs. >> it will be something that will be easy to clean, permeable, but easy to clean. >> i haven't seen the stuff you're talking about. i'm not very happy about that being a feature of public open spaces, dogs, people or both of them. we should carefully look at that as nothing we really want to be associated with. >> commissioner sugaya. >> y
think sometimes people tune us out. but we feel strongly that with the partnerships that we have in the community we can make an impact and i think there's a bias or there's an assumption in sports that it's a homophobic industry, it's almost like that man bites dog, people look up and say, wait a minute, that's not the way to do things. >> we have talked about policy, legal, now you hear about organizations doing boots on the ground and doing work in their communities. michael, you said something interesting, that family can sometimes not be a positive influence. let's get micro, what influences do you draw upon, what influenced you to become an antibias aspect, personal or family, aspects of your own cultural identity? >> okay, being the eldest of three and a vietnamese family is very difficult. throw in being gay, it makes it a lot more stressful. and throw in being clinically labeled as obese at age 13, you have a recipe for bullying and discrimination all over. so that was me. and it was hard and it wasn't until someone took a chance on me and mr. burket saved my life.
will be kids and we had someone who was mean to us in school to actual bullying, but we have talked to the school districts around the state and sometimes the teachers have the blind's eye and it's more work to get involved and more work and what do relationships look like, and i agree with tony this is the beginning of relationship building, or it's a relationship going bad that could get worse. and so i think that we have a lot of educating to do. in my office we do a lot of cyber bullying training in our schools and it's amazing how much access some kids have to the internet at a really young age. they have iphones. they're on the internet. they have or smartphones. they have computers in the bedroom and parent it is never over the shoulder to see what is going online. there is a lot of unrestricted access to the internet and the internet has put it on another level and one push of a button and everybody in the school will have a picture or hear it and the outcome of that is -- it would be not just reconciling relationships or restorative justice or some other way between t
think of something in all of them in the last 24 hours that you had to use, that you had to activate in relationships with the co-workers or spouses and these are different life skills and there is the area of responsible decision making and comes into play when you have to figure out what to do when you have a problem, so you can probably just look at that and "oh yes, i see where the connections would be" and i would like to kind of point out because we are talking about bullying today -- one of the things i love -- i don't know if rosylyn is still in the room but she talked about a specific example. this is an example of what a teacher should be able to do if she sees something in the hallway and described this whole process and when i was listening to that i was thinking oh my gosh in every category that person would have to be very socially emotionally competent. you need the awareness to know something is going on. you need that empathy to compel you do something about t you need the management skills to approach that situation calmly and not be over reactive. you need to h
to address us on the vexing issue of bullying. it is my pleasure to introduce the mayor of san francisco, ed lee. . >> thank you, ann, for that wonderful introduction and i don't know where you got the ease of coming to the mayor's ofrs, there was no ease on that. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for joining together here at the presidio with all the different agencies. i see phil ginsburg, i know bill is around, others from our da office, richard caranza and others from the women's status as well and the district attorneys from the various counties, the school administrators and instructors and superintendents from other counties as well, as well as our community-based agencies that are so invaluable it all of us. this is a very important topic and it's one that our u.s. attorney, melinda hague and i helped spearhead yesterday with 800 students who came together who watch an incredible film by lee hirsch i've heard the wonderful reports from the kids, seen their laughter and their tears. we are going to honor your making that film by doing what we need to do to stop bullying across the co
us after a bunch of trades. the los angeles dodgers are -- all right. the giants. they're down to two games of cincinnati. they win three straight. the reds are? >> audience: out of here! >> it has to be louder for the next two. are you ready? the giants go to st. louis and need to win there and back home. the st. louis cardinals are? >> audience: out of here! >> now for the big one. the mighty american league detroit tigers. you ready? the detroit tigers -- they are? audience: out of here! >> you never disappoint. here is my partner mike. >> well, we have become an organization of expertation. there's expectation when you win a championship in 2010 and there is expectation when you get in that ballpark everyday and it's over flowing with your love and affection and there is purity in the formula that this organization goes about trying to meet those standards of excellence. it starts with the fans of historians that we call investors that kept us here in san francisco and goes to the front office comprised of men and women dedicating their lives to this team and goe
bond so it serves as a great example how we use the park bonds to of benefit of all of our users and residents and especially because we want our southeast sector to continue evolving in a positive way for everybody. it has been a trial for many of the residents here for many years because of the leadership of the different agencies working together with environmental advocates to make sure we strike that right balance we can have the spaces used for the different use and it is enjoyment of the environment at the same time for the residents. thank you for being here with this announcement. we get four things out of this. a dog run, heron's head park with the landscape and wonderful access to it. we have the literacy for justice modernization here and of course we have the bi- directional lines for the bicycles and thanks for being here and congratulations to everybody. it has been a great part of this collaboration. this great team work and go giants and now go warriors. [applause] >> thank you mayor lee for your leadership for this development. i want to introduce also mon
and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so proud of san francisco in being there because the superintendent, he's, you can tell he's a teacher because he took control of that room. there was a thousand people in that room, he had them all raise their hands to quiet them down, it was beautiful. you could see the teacher in him. but i was so proud of being in san francisco because the kids -- kids are kids -- they were warned, you need to be respectful, you nee
morning. the challenge of 3 minutes to speak about programs that are best practices, i probably used up half my time just saying that. let me be clear as the next slide would come up, the problem of bullying is changing, morphing, mutating, younger, meaner, more pervasive as kids have more tools. i want to be clear that the approach that our nation has taken to date is out of the ashes of columbine. we refer to it as an outside approach. what most schools did back then was try to secure a school from ingress, guns coming in and sro's and cameras can stop the guns but they can't stop the kids who bring in other weapons, weapons of bias, weapons of grudges from the neighborhood, values from home. we need to have a different approach. the approach we are talking about is a relational approach. it's an inside out approach, an approach really based on empowering young people not to be consumers but to be contributors in their own schools, not to be the problems but to be the solutions because clearly we've learned and know that we cannot legislate compassion and we cannot punish our chi
love you provided us selling out all 89 home games and all the wonderful fanses, and i see some of you that traveled withed team, road warriors to make road games feel like home games. you inspired us. we know you filled this plaza on sunday when we were in detroit. we know you cheer friday your couches at home, from your neighborhood street parties and then throughout october with the city we lit up the city. it was a washid orange from coit tower to the ferry building to right here at city hall. what can we take away from our 2012 giants? i believe we can take away life lessons. vuch teachable moments for our children and our team did face challenges and whether facing injuries or newly acquired players or facing elimination game one after another. what were the life lessons? never give up no matter how high the mountain is to climb. have integrity and conduct yourself with professionalism. did this team do that? absolutely. play with a team with unselfish devotion. trust one another and love your team teammates and in always do so have fun and it's meant to be played a
and 1 dollar from all of us. that can really help and donate at red cross .org and we thank you for your generosity. it was just two years ago that we captured the championship since moving to san francisco and i think we're happy we didn't have to wait until 52 years. [cheers and applause] we've got another trophy in this great city by the bay. [cheers and applause] so today giants fans once again you are all world champions and together we are giants, so we have a wonderful program planned for you today and i know you're anxious to get this started started and bring the guys out and celebrate your 2012 san francisco giants so let's get started. first of all we are joined by a number of special dignitaries who have helped to make san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz,
of the criminal rampage that began in irvine, california. he used a firearm to rob to banks in southern california, of threatening to shoot the tellers if they did not comply. gave no consideration to anyone who got in the way of his criminal ambition or effort to escape. as a direct result of his disregard for anyone who might come in to counter with his criminal endeavors, and as well as san francisco police officer lives were jeopardized. the suspect complete disregard for the public put a great risk any person who might inadvertently cross his path, should he escape from the park. searchers got ryan, rubin reyes recognize the danger. even when faced with serious bodily injury or death, these officers remain steadfast and determined to protect not only themselves and one another, but the public at large from the disregard of the fleeing fugitive. sir john ryan, officer lou andrelieu and reyes , when confd with a violent situation, they responded with no were the bravery and poise. they were fully responsible to the danger, but to the rapidly- devolving life-threatening circumstances that unfold
're just playing. if you use those words to put somebody down, it is unacceptable. then you get the kids on task where to go and you watch them as they go away. you can get a tremendous amount of information -- police people in the room. watching people walk away from that kind of moment, you get a tremendous amount of information. the person complaining the most about you probably has the most social power. the kids agreeing with that kid, as the bystander said, become the perpetrators. the kids who don't like it or the target probably aren't going to be saying anything. so you watch the kids walk away and assess them. then if you hear as the kis are walking down the hall, she's such a b, you say, wait 1 second, i just heard you call me a b i'm coming at you with respect, i'm talking to you, i'm not yelling at you, i'm not doing this, i'm not doing that, i'm coming and telling you what i want for you and every kid in this school. are we clear? now go to your class. now, if the kid does that and he does it to you again, sure, write it up. but it has to be with the authority of you
action coalition and on behalf of our 70 something members. this project was presented to us earlier in the year and to make its a brief as possible, we loved it. it's right in our sweet spot. the urbanism, fantastic, on-site affordable housing. enormous amount of bicycle parking. it is a strong and welcome addition to this evolving neighborhood. i think the benefits of this project are so obvious and so overwhelming i'm not sure exactly why i'm here except i fear physical violence from bob if i don't express these views. [laughter] >>> i don't think you should hesitate a second before approving this project. it's wonderful. >>> good afternoon, commissioners, danny campbell with the sheet workers local 104. and i echo that gentleman. this is going to be a great benefit to the community. you know, the open spaces that i saw, there's really exciting. the planner mr. guy said, it meets the goals of the transbay plan. you know, there are wonderful economic benefits with the fees it's going to bring the city. i think this is a great project so we look forward to your support. thank you. >
or four of us at 7:00 p.m. made it the profile picture and about an hour later and it exploded and starting with the soccer team making it the profile pictures and the girls did and the whole school got involved. 100 people liked it, commented on it, tagged them in and made it their profile and the entire site was covered with it. he came to school the next day like he was 10 feet tall. once he had that confidence he was throwing himself out like a rag doll. one game hammering shot and shot and shot and he makes the best save i have ever seen. he was parallel to the ground and did a superman dive and 10 seconds later the ref blew the whistle and we won. >> i started running and people were chasing me and wow best moment of my life. i changed from the freshman kid to danielle quie, the best goal keeper. >> the whole school stood up for someone who needed it. >> he was a normal kid just like us. we have our highs and lows and that's when we realize that we were all danielle quie. [applause] >> nice job. that is more normative than bullying. that -- i mean that pink shirt
use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud of the work around the issue of tolerance but we look at it as prevention. we don't want to be responding to issues once they happen so we work very hard to build relationships that are truly centered around individuality in the schools so to be proactive we build these strong communities. we have conversations about our communities. our balance score cards at every one of our schools developed and revises every year has a component talking about a safety healthy community in it. we talk about fair processes. we talk about having conversations in circles so no one is ahead of the conversation, so we all have equal standing those conversations. our behavioral guidelines at schools have in are based on this notion of equity and equality and this notion we're going to treat efer everyone fairly and jill mentioned my former title and superintendent of social justice
you on the spot first just because i was so upset you left us when i was mayor and we tried to keep you, but i'm so happy for oakland. but, tony, you have any comments or questions for our two esteemed panelists, particularly ruslyn who has been saying so many nice things about you. you should reciprocate. >> we also have a really big investigation going in oakland. i'm not sure -- tony is right. be nice. >> thank you, yeah, good morning, everybody. thank you very much. so we are pretty deep in an investigation about the disproportionate suspension of african american males and the reason we have been able to engage so deeply is because of the understanding that unless we take a really deep healing approach, unless we look at the root issue, bullying will persist. so we said you need to have a universal goal that you can eliminate bullying but it's really about creating a caring school community. what i would ask, this question of definition, can you, though, ask for communities to come forward with what it would look like to be, what's the vision for youth in our cities across
's a brutal event. for us it's a great cause but a crappy --. >> you are right. thank you so much. assembly man tom ammiano has his own story about bullying but you are the author of what we've been talking about today. >> it sounds trite, but all politics being personal, you've probably heard that before many times. in the case of this bill, that does ring true. i was on the bridge board for many years and meeting after meeting parents would come, particularly of teenagers who had jumped, and it was heart breaking and poignant and that feeling of helplessness that we all have, very reminiscent of this story and of your story in terms of what the parents go through and the inaction. and we finally were able to get a suicide deterrent plan and we're looking forward to getting that money authorized soon so that we can start construction. but as a kid in the 50's in newark, new jersey, i was, shall we say, a little fey, a little high strung, my mother used to say. i guess like a moth to the flame attracted all kinds of undesirable attention including from some of the teachers. we had a foo
. i am done. that was his turning point. call it a turning point, called the teachable moment. use whatever terminology that you want. that is where we need to be present. when i say we, i mean, we. at that turning point, at that moment of truth, that teachable moment, it is imperative that resources be brought to bear. now, what are the two most impressive resources that are brought to bear at that moment. there are two major forces that helped gang members change. one of them is tattoo removal. this is the first major force in the denunciation. the second is legal assistance. surprising. you did not see this on the video and i never thought of this. the first thing individuals need, not to feel like gang members -- is to erase their past. they have literally talked with me about feeling -- removing these tattoos and legal excitement. it is not that simple. changing from being a gang member to a former gang member involves a change in identity. this is a tricky process. it is slow and steady, and there is frustration. the gang is replaced with drugs, and there are fallbacks. relap
in the seat belt and was not working. he used his knife to reach into the car and cut it. the heat was so hot his face was burning. it scorched his face and hair. he did not retreat. he went into the vehicle and remove the individual from the vehicle. as soon as they got away to safety, the vehicle exploded. the fire department is still not on scene. before they arrived there was a taxicab driver who had attempted to break the window and he was unable to and it got so hot that he retreated. these men did not retreat. they did not hesitate. they did not think about running. to this day, this person is able to wake up in the morning and look at his family. for that break, you are being given the silver medal of valor. [applause] capt. eric vintero and officers heppler and carrasco. >> good evening. i would like to introduce officer troy carrasco and william elppler, october 3, 2011, police dispatch put out a call of the stabbing that had just occurred. several richmond units began responding to the scene. officer robert long are right first in salt a suspect standing in front of 16th avenue. he
that would be a very effective means for him to intervene. in dealing with the violent us youth, they need to make them understand that they have done something, there will be repercussions, there will be consequences. they will have to serve their time, but not get lost in the shuffle. prison can have two or facts. it can make someone want to be more productive member of society or they can become more integrated into the gang lifestyle. these individuals can go in and aligned with these groups and now they come out and they are more respected in the community in the wrong aspect and they're going to do something more severe. we need to -- was these people go to prison, do not lose touch with them. meet them when they are being sentenced. >> i love something you just did. you said "he needs to" and a new corrected yourself and said "we need to." we need to be thinking along those lines. you are basically out of prison, correct? you have grown up in richmond, an area that is labeled gang infested. when you listen to this, how do each of you react? what do think of what he is saying? could
about your project and with the schools. >> i want us to think about -- as the day we have been challenging ourselves what we can do to make a contribution, one of the things to think about is the way in which i'm trying to address the problem of sensitivity and there are some kids of different thresholds and definitions and everyone has the right to their emotional truth and we need kids to learn more social skills and resiliency and all of these things that i am doing and never would have done it and hit me in the last year or two. i was going to do a chapter -- i am and kids on the spectrum of autism andace perers and targeted or initiated into perpetrating, which i dealt with last week, are perpetrators and aggressors, so i wanted to work on that so i'm working with kids and with aspergers and autism and one thing that struck me is we need to be able on the flip side, so i'm now writing to kids when you are the one that has more of a thick skin, whatever you want to call it, how do you interact with kids who are more sensitive? just how do you do that? how do you recogniz
it and can help, that we are doing the kinds of outreach that the attorney general and the u.s. attorney talk about, as arnie says as well, get out there and teach in the communities, it can't happen from washington. over the last year alone, we've seen a 34 percent increase just between 2010 and 2011 on bullying and harassment cases. 32 percent of those are about sexual or gender based stereotyping and harassment, 41 percent on disability and 40 percent on race and national origin. we've just started monitoring those trends since 2009 we've been collecting those data. so it appears that while historically we were doing a lot more on things like disability harassment, it's actually a kind of racial harassment that in fact might be getting worse and certainly getting a lot more obvious. one of the ways that we have partnered, department of education and department of justice was right here at the university of california in san diego where you might have heard about the compton cookout and the alleged noose in the library and we have heard similar instances in california and elsewhere, thing
and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it was not a choice. this is just how was. let's go get him. and it comes to the place, you get tired of running. i did not see this as being wrong. what people defined as a gang, that must be a gang member right there. i have tattoos on my arm and neck and hand, and none of them are getting associated. they all tell personal story in my life. somebody would say that this is a gang memb
question for the future because what we may hear later today on our calendar about a potential use on a ground floor of a neighborhood commercial district. we want active uses that are day and night and all these arguments that come up. but if you don't allow them on the second floor, where are they going to be? because they can't be on the ground floor, they can't be on the second floor. you want people to frequent neighborhoods and take care of their business. if they have to go somewhere else, get in their car to take care of some of their business that involves a professional of some kind, you know, it's very restrictive. but that's not what's before us. we only have the ability to pass what this is right now. did you find out about the parking? >> off-street parking for residential, none is required. and it's permitted for .5 cars per unit and conditional use for .75 cars per unit. not permitted above that. >> i think that's pretty restrictive. if somebody wants to build infill parking somewhere in this area and -- our housing would be principally permitted, i would think, alo
sponsor. completing this in kind agreement will enable us to finalize those within the next couple of months. in time to meet the construction schedule. based on their schedule both the park and surrounding development would be completed in mid 2014. at that time the park built with further requirements of the legal agreements made between the city and the project sponsor. now talk about the required commission action. to complete this in kind agreement requires the planning commission to approve an impact fee waiver of 1.88 million dollars for the in kind improvements. there are certain thresholds daggett park must meet to approve the inkind agreement. i'll walk through the thresholds and how we believe the park meets the threshold. it must be eligible for an in kind agreement. to be eligible for an in kind agreement the proposed project must meet the following three requirements. first fulfill community improvements. second, infrastructure type is identified in the fee ordinance and third, the expenditure category for the infrastructure type has not been exhausted. so, the propos
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